The Rise of Tech Blogs in the Mid-2000s

An excerpt from the Techlash Book as a gift to my fellow geeks. Let’s take a stroll down memory lane.

Nirit Weiss-Blatt
Nirit Weiss-Blatt, The Techlash and Tech Crisis Communication, Chapter 1, page 14.
Ben Lang (@benin) and Sivan Cohen (@sivanco) — a Conduit and Wibiya production
Dan Frommer (@fromedome), Rise of the Tech Bandits, SAY magazine, Summer 2012 issue.

If you could have shown me the web in 1983, or even 1993, I would have cheerfully traded an infinite number of computer magazines for the chance to read an endless, endlessly diverse quantity of information about tech products, updated not once a month but all day, every day, for free. And today, as much as I once loved computer magazines, I wouldn’t trade The Verge, Engadget, AllThingsD, Ars Technica, Daring Fireball, 9to5Mac, ZDNet, TechCrunch, and my other favorite tech sites to get them back. The golden age of computer magazines was glorious, but the golden age of computer journalism is now.

In the standard theory about technology blogs … mainstream media were out of touch, elitist, or simply ossified, and they would soon be supplanted by a grass-roots army of bloggers working intently at their laptops to speak truth to power. The reality is that while there are now as many tech blogs as stars in the sky, only a tiny fraction of them matter. And those that do aren’t part of some proletarian information revolution, but instead have become the tech world’s new elite.

Abby Rogers (@abbyrogers), PRESENTING: The 101 Tech People You Have To Follow On Twitter, Business Insider, May 21, 2012 — Om Malik
David Risley (@davidrisley), “How We Are Blogging” infographic, davidrisley.com.
Credit: Dan Frommer (@fromedome), Rise of the Tech Bandits, SAY magazine, Summer 2012 issue.
Ron Miller (@ron_miller) — Tweet.

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Dr. (Ph.D.). Book Author: The Techlash and Tech Crisis Communication. Contributor: Techdirt. Former visiting research fellow, USC. Expertise: Tech Journalism.

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Nirit Weiss-Blatt

Dr. (Ph.D.). Book Author: The Techlash and Tech Crisis Communication. Contributor: Techdirt. Former visiting research fellow, USC. Expertise: Tech Journalism.